Thursday, June 6, 2019

Peasreads: The Number of Love (The Codebreakers Book #1)



Heyo folks, this review is written by the 15 year old daughter of peasreads. Just a heads up :) and apologies in advance T^T

This book really deserves every single one of those stars. Normally, I shy away from giving books a 100% because perfection's pretty hard to obtain. *The Number of Love* (asterisks stand for italics) got impressively close. I practically devoured this book like a black whole, so I hope this review gives it justice and doesn't bore you to death :)



What I really enjoyed about this book:
- Every single female was a solid, round character. They all had their flaws and their strengths and many of which strayed far from stereotypical flaws/strengths (ie "wow! She's so *strong and beautiful and smart. I mean, she's got a tough past, but she'll persevere!!"). They all have their own ideas about life - from revolutionary thoughts of mathematics majors to longing for a housewife life. All together, this makes for a realistic time setting and astounding female characters. Not only this, but there are strong male characters as well. This book has a stunning protagonist, but none of the side characters or love interests go underdeveloped and flat. In this novel (potentially a series ...?) the strong male characters compliment and develop along with the females. Having one gender with all the attention or power takes away from the believability of a book: thankfully, *The Number of Love* stays very clear of that field while enforcing the idea of a capable female antagonist.
* that's a reverence. I'll love you forever if you get it :)
- Writers Craft. For the first few pages, I wasn't sure if it was a style I'd like, since it was different from most I've experienced. After those pages ... I devoured this book and was immersed for at least and hour and a half. The writers craft really appeals to me, and seems to fit into the time period well. R. White nails the way she tells this story, seamlessly bringing it into life. Everything - from the way character's thoughts are given, to descriptions of scenery, and character introductions/reveals - fits so well together and I haven't the faintest idea why. I love it, it takes this book to a surreal level.
- The romance. I'm definitely not a stranger to romance novels, since that seems to be all the teen section can ever produce (whether it's the main focus or not). This romance was refreshing and sweet, and readers can tell it was built on solid foundations - ment to last. In my opinion, that's quite a bit better then steamy "I've only known you for a month but you're the only reason I'm still alive and fighting for the well being of the planet" books. Aside from that fact which already puts this book pretty high up, the details are what really sell the romance. R. White perfectly portrays situations the characters could end up in at the time, *and* how said characters would react. Convincingly. She doesn't have them shove away facts of insecurities to push the plot. Instead, she uses these moments to develop them and their relationship.
- "Low Key Espionage". I claim full responsibility for that random tag. I just really like espionage, and while this book isn't really about that, it's got some pretty cool moments. Every single one of those moments fits perfectly into the time period and almost sounds like a real event. I extremely enjoy that about this book :)
- Clean Read. Pretty sure this book only has one typed out curse. And even then, the character points out it how it it's a fairly accurate description of the situation. So, even if one word pops up every 150 pages or so, it's never excessive or crude and out of the blue. The main character later mentions that she does filter curses in her head, which explains how it's clean while staying true to WWI. As for drugs: none. Sex: none, not even innuendo. Pretty sure the most that ever happens is a quick kiss, will *very* clear consent involved :)
- Christian. This is a personal bonus, but I'm sure readers of every faith can appreciate how dedicated and trusting the characters are with God. It's also a good insight for any atheists. I appreciated that the author included the prejudice denominations had against each other in the war (possibly today as well), not whitewashing it for readers.
- The Plot. I'm fairly sure this is one of only a few books I've read that still managed to surprise me 75% of the way through. Even though some of the surprises aren't great for the characters, they tickled me pink when they popped up :) no spoilers, but this book has an a m a z i n g plotline
- ... Oof, I'll spare you more. I'm sure you can tell by now I really, *really* liked this book

Things I didn't like:
Il n'y a rien


You folks are probably tired of reading this. Or you've skipped to a more *brief* review (I see you, you smart human being). I'm fairly satisfied with the summery of the book (sometimes they're lacking), so I'll leave y'all and hope you're still sane after reading this :) 


  I received this book from Bethany House for this review. I was under no obligation to give a positive review. All opinions are on my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”


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